Eureka Prize

We were proud to sponsor the Voiceless Eureka Prize for Scientific Research that Contributes to Animal Protection.   

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Eureka Prize

From 2005 to 2012, Voiceless supported the Australian Museum's Eureka Prizes for outstanding achievements by the scientific community. The Voiceless Eureka Prize awarded $10,000 annually to an individual or research team whose work had contributed, or had the potential to contribute, to animal protection. 

Areas of scientific research that were considered for the prize included:

  • research that reduced or eliminated the use of animals or animal products in laboratory-based research, education and testing (such as developing alternative methods that do not require animal use);
  • research that reduced suffering of wild animals - including native animals, pest species or feral animals (such as developing non-lethal management techniques for feral animals);
  • research that reduced suffering of farm animals (such as research into the physical or psychological effects of intensive farming methods including mutilations without pain relief, solitary confinement and confinement indoors); and
  • research that addressed community values, attitudes or behaviour towards animals or animal protection.

2012 Winner

Professor Clive Phillips, University of Queensland

Professor Clive Phillips conducts research that improves animal welfare and increases our understanding of attitudes towards animals. The research covers farm, captive-wild and companion animals. Key areas include the export of livestock from Australia, reducing under-nutrition in rangeland animals, improving conditions for captive wildlife and increasing respect for animals. Read more

Professor Phillips is a member of Voiceless's Scientific Expert Advisory Council. Ondine Sherman, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Voiceless, was a member of the judging panel for the Voiceless Eureka Prize. Please note that once the Conflict of Interest (COI) was noted, the Eureka Prizes COI Policy required  Ondine to withdraw from ranking and discussing Professor Phillips' entry in order to ensure the judging process was fully impartial. For more information, please see the Eureka Prizes COI Policy

Finalists

Dr S. Eric Han, University of New South Wales

Human entrapment neuropathy, especially Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, is a potentially debilitating condition affecting thousands of Australians that is traditionally investigated using animal models. Dr Eric Han has set about changing this by developing an alternative method of investigating nerve dysfunction that is animal free and directly translatable to the human clinical condition.

Professor Peter Timms, Queensland University of Technology

Koalas are in desperate need of our help, with many wild populations being progressively wiped out. Chlamydial disease is a major threat, causing devastating diseases such as blindness, reproductive cysts and infertility. Professor Peter Timms’ team is developing a vaccine against Chlamydia in koalas, with trials showing great promise.

 

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